Dance · Pointe

POINTE SHOE CHRONICLES – shoe aftercare

You’ve bought your pointe shoes, prepared them, broken them in and dance your heart out in them during class. That’s it right?? WRONG! What you do with your pointe shoes after class and how you store them will have a big impact on how well they wear and ultimately how long they last you! So take note!
Typically, a class can be anywhere between 45 mins to 90 mins. That is up to an hour and a half of your hard working feet being encased in your torture chambers………ahem………….I mean pointe shoes! And like any part of your body, they perspire. That means sweat! Yes, I know it’s gross, but when you’re a dancer, you do a LOT of it, so get used to it. Sweat is moisture, and moisture will break down the layers of paste and fabric in the structure of your shoe. In the end, of course, that’s inevitable, that’s how you end up with dead pointe shoes, but there are a few things you can do to help prolong the life of your shoes. 

HANG THEM UP.

When you’ve took you’re shoes off after class, DO NOT just throw them in your bag or wrap the ribbons around them and forget about them until the next class. When you take them off, they will be softer due to your feet and sweat working them hard! By burying them in your bag, never to see the light of day till your next class, you’re not giving them time to dry. Air needs to circulate in and around them for them to dry off in a natural position. Squashed in your dark bag, they will dry unevenly, if at all, causing them to distort. The best way is to tie your shoes together by their ribbons and hang them off your bag by the strap, then when you’re home, hang them over your door handle, wardrobe door, mirror, hook or anything that will give them air and light. And what’s more, they will then double as a pretty room decoration! Bonus! 

Another thing to mention here is that if you wear padding in your shoe of any sort, take them out of the shoe straight away, for the same reason. If the pads are damp and they stay in your shoes, your shoes will stay damp.

MULTIPLE PAIRS.

If you’re a full time student, or you take 3 + classes a week in your shoes, you may want to consider buying 2 pairs (or more if needed) Pointe shoes need at least a FULL 24 HOURS of drying time. If they are not getting that, they are potentially not fully dry the next time you wear them, meaning they are slightly softer each time, and so you’ll get less wear out of them before the die. Buying 2 pairs at once might seem expensive, but with only 1 pair, you’ll be getting though them double the speed, and have to buy a second pair much sooner anyway, so it’d be the same cost, but the shoe will maintain its structural integrity, helping your technique and safety of execution. 

NEW ENGINEERING.

Technology moves so fast these days it’s hard to keep up. Or if you’re like me, a traditionalist through and through, nothing but the age old paste and fabric will do. But what if there’s another way? There are now   new innovative designers of pointe shoes that have shunned the perhaps outdated methods for something all together more modern. Mentioning no brands in particular (I’m sure you know anyway) there is a certain company that manufacturers pointe shoes using pliable plastics. Just like other brands, they come in different shapes and shank strengths, but the difference is that because they are plastic, they aren’t so much affected my moisture, making them last much longer than a traditional shoe. This brand is particularly popular with full time students and professionals who have multiple classes and performances, not just because they last longer, but because of the pliable plastics, they are almost broken in straight away, supple but still with the strength and support needed. You pay a hefty sum for such engineering, but again, of you weigh up the cost of buying multiple shoes, it becomes more affordable.

SEASONS.

You need to take into account the time of year it is. In the summer, you will sweat more, but it will mean your shoes will air dry slightly quicker. In the winter, you will still sweat, but because of the colder temperatures, shoes will take longer to dry. A good trick is to place them standing up on the box platform on top of a radiator or boiler cupboard, or somewhere that’s dry and warm. It will help them to dry out thoroughly. This is also a good idea if you have multiple performances or a show where you would be dancing in your shoes on consecutive nights. Putting them on a radiator will ensure they are dried out enough without having being left for 24 hours.
Pointe shoes aren’t cheap, and you should also think about your safety. The tips above will help you to get the most out of your shoes and hopefully save you some hard earned cash too. 
Happy pointe-ing!
Alicia 💗

Dance · Exercise · Pointe

POINTE SHOE CHRONICLES – Breaking in your shoes

As I have brand new pointe shoes at the moment, I thought I’d share with you a few little exercises I do to help break in my pointe shoes, so I can dance the best I can in them at classs. These may not be the technical terms, but it’s what I call them, so here goes;

SOFTENING

I talked in my previous post POINTE SHOE CHRONICLES – how to prepare your shoes https://amummyfirst.wordpress.com/2017/05/09/pointe-shoe-chronicles-preparing-your-shoes/ about this. Simply wearing them around the house will start to soften and warm the layers of paste up, moulding them to your feet. You don’t even have to execute any dance steps! Walking around in them will really help to soften the shank and the top of the box, to help you find your semi pointe. You can also hold the shoe directly over a boiled kettle. The steam will do exactly the same thing. Give them a second or too to cool slightly before putting them on, then as they cool down, they will be cooling and setting to the shape of your foot. But please be careful! I don’t want any scalded fingers or toes! Use your caution or get your mum to help you.


ROLL THROUGHS

Start in parallel (6th position) facing the barre. Rise up to Demi pointe, pushing as hard as you can. (Demi is particularly hard in very new shoes as the shank will be stiff, but the only way it’ll get easier is if you keep doing it!) Go through Demi on to full pointe. Do a  small plié (bend your knees) you’ll feel you will naturally go over your box more. Use this weight to push through your ribbons and the tops of your ankles, it will help to bend the shoe so you can be fully on your box. Keeping the knees bent, lower to demi, again pushing forward. Then lower the heels and straighten your legs. Repeat this maybe 10 times.


REVERSE ROLL THROUGHS

This is exactly what it means. You’re going to do everything you did before, but in reverse order. Start in parallel and bend your knees. Peel the heels off the floor as your rise up to Demi, keeping the knees bent. Again the weight you create whilst having bent knees will really help to bend the shoes. Slowly rise onto full pointe. (Be mindful not to let the shoe do the work and ‘pop’ up from Demi to full, really feel the pressure and use your toes to rise up, this is where you build your strength!) push through your ribbons and ankles to full get onto your box. Straighten the knees whilst trying to maintain the position of the feet and ankles. Slowly lower down to Demi, then follow with the heels. This can be done around 10 times. You will notice the difference in the feel of these 2 exercises, even though they are essentially the same.


PRANCES

I call these prances, as it reminds me of horses that compete in dressage! Start in parallel. Rise up through demi on to full pointe. Starting with the right foot, slowly lower in onto demi pointe, keeping the left on full pointe. You’ll need to bend your left knee as you lower. Push through Demi onto flat foot. So right foot in flat and left in en pointe with bent knee. Whilst you’re here, you can then push over your box on the left foot. Then rise up to Demi on to full pointe again. Then switch legs. Slowly lower left foot to Demi keeping the right en pointe. Lower left heel. Push over pointe with right foot. Push up to Demi with left, then back up to full pointe. Do 10. Key to this exercise is speed. Keep it nice and slow and controlled making sure not to miss out demi pointe. 


PULL BACKS

Start in parallel. Rise up through demi to full pointe. Take a small plié and push through your ribbons and the front of your ankles. Slowly straighten the knees whilst reign to keep the alignment of the feet and ankles. Repeat 10 times. Here you are using your body weight to help bend the shank.


ONE FOOTED PULL BACKS.

Only attempt these if you have strong ankles. Not suitable for beginners. Stick with the 2 FOOTED version until you build your strength. Start in parallel and rise up through demi onto full pointe. Pick one foot up to coup de pied (by the ankle bone) Slowly bend your supporting leg, using the weight to push through your shoe. Straighten the leg trying to mainting the foots position. Alignment is especially important here. Do not let your foot sickle in this position, you risk damage. Keep the line straight running from your hip bone, down your knee, through the top of the foot and your big toe. Don’t compensate your alignment in order to push over, you’ll be building bad habits that are harder to correct once you reach the centre. Do 5 on each foot. This one is particularly hard going on your feet.


PULL BACKS IN SECOND.

Exactly the same thoughts with the regular PULL BACKS but this time in second position. Take a wider SECOND than you would normally when en pointe. This is because when we take a plié, we want to stay in a nice 90 degree shape, not letting the knees push to far over our toes. Rise up through demi to full pointe. Plié and really think about pushing ankles through your ribbons. Again you are using your weight to help you. Try to mainitain position as you straighten. Do 5 really nice slow ones, and watch those knees! 

I have advised what exercises/how many I do. Please listen to your body. Your feet will tire more easily in new shoes, as they have more resistance to work against. Perhaps start with half the amount first and build up. Also, with all these exercises, it’s quality of movement rather than quantity. You want to be building your alignment and technique correctly, right from the beginning. If you are tiring, your technique will slip. So be mindful and enjoy the process. 

These exercises can be used as a warm up before class to get your feet and shoes ready to work! 

Be sure to visit my Instagram page @ballerina_mum for a video of these exercises as a visual!

Alicia 💗