Dance · ballet · Sleeping Beauty

Ballet classics – Sleeping Beauty

Everyone is so familiar with the story of Sleeping Beauty, with thanks to the Disney version. The ballet version is based on the tale from The brothers Grimm, and has slight differences.

The music was written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky,  and first performed in 1890, originally called ‘The Sleeping princess’.  King Florestan and the QUEEN are celebrating the christening of their daughter PRINCESS AURORA.  Among the guests are 6 magical fairies (the names of the fairies change from production to production) with the most important one being the LILAC FAIRY.  They each give a gift, but as the Lilac fairy goes to give hers, the evil fairy CARABOSSE arrives, angry at not being invited. The King blames his Master of ceremonies, who Carabosse beats with her stick before placing a curse on the baby, on her 16th birthday, she will prick her finger on a spindle and die! The lilac fairy intervenes, and although unable to undo the curse, she is able to alter it, so that the Princess falls into a sleep for 100 years to be woken by a kiss from a prince. Everyone is out at ease and the festivities continue.

Aurora’s birthday arrives and there’s lots of dancing and potential suitors for her to meet! A cloaked stranger offers her a gift, a spindle, and as she has never seen one, she’s curious and takes a closer look. She pricks her finger and falls to the floor. Carabosse reveals herself from under the cape and is satisfied she is dead. The Princess is carried off to bed and the Lilac fairy goes about putting a spell over the castle and it’s people to also put them in a deep sleep, only to awake when the Princess does.

Fast forward 100 years and we meet  PRINCE DÉSIRÈ out in a hunting trip. The Lilac fairy appears to him, having chosen him to awake Aurora, and takes him to the castle. Carabosse has one last attempt at stopping them, but fails. The prince finds Aurora, kisses her and she wakes, as do the rest of the people. The King and Queen are ecstatic with the Prince, and he proposes to Aurora, which she accepts.
The final act is the wedding. The Lilac fairy, along with the other fairies and some recognisable guests from other fairy tales are in attendance. The prince and princess are wed with the Lilac fairy blessing the union. Then all the guests gather and create a tableau to end the ballet.

Did you know that Walt Disney actually bought some of the rights to the music from Sleeping Beauty, which is why some of it appears in the film. Some people claim that fact inhibits some productions of the ballet due to copyright laws.

Sleeping Beauty was always my favourite story growing up. I think it’s that love can overcome evil. I have yet to see this in production, but it’s down on my list! 
Alicia 💗

ballet · Dance · Pointe

Ballet classics – La Sylphide

Jurgita Dronina and Harrison James dance in La Sylphide. (ALEKSANDAR ANTONJEVIC

Here we have another story of magical beings, love, betrayal and star crossed lovers. Spot a theme?!

La Sylphide is actually one of the oldest surviving ballets, dating back to 1832! The version we live and know today was choreographed by August Bournonville in 1836.

It’s set in bonny Scotland around a man named JAMES and his fiancé Effie on the lead up to their wedding in a country farmhouse. 

One night, James falls asleep by the fire, a SYLPH (a forest spirit) falls in love with him, dances around him and eventually kisses him. As he wakes up, she disappears. James wakes his friend GURN, who doesn’t know anything about the Sylph. James puts it behind him and thinks about his upcoming wedding.

As Effie and her bridal party arrive, James goes out to greet them but sees a shadow behind them. He runs over, thinking it is the Sylph, but instead he finds OLD MADGE, a local witch. James is disappointed. Effie asks the witch to read their fortune. She tells her that James is in love with someone else and that Effie will end up with Gurn. James is angry and forces Old Madge to leave.

James is alone and the Sylph appears to him again. He is totally captivated by her and they kiss. Gurn sees all this and runs to tell Effie. But when everyone arrives in the room to see what’s going on, the Sylph has disappeared and they think Gurn has made it up out of jealousy. Festivities and dancing break out. The Sylph returns and takes the wedding ring off James, putting it on her own finger and running off into the forest. James immediately follows leaving Effie heartbroken.

The Sylph introduces James to her forest friends and they dance for him. Meanwhile the other guests have followed into the forest looking for James. Gurn finds his hat, and comes across Old Madge. She tells him to propose to Effie, which he does and she accepts, then they leave. James returns and Old Madge gives h a magic scarf. She tells him it will bind the Sylph to him forever and they can be together.

Reunited with the Sylph, he loves the scarf around her, her wings fall off, but she then dies. He sees her spirit above him and collapses. Madge is happy with the results.

Another ballet from the romantic era, so expect dreamy long tulle skirted tutus, lots of Georgia and elevation in allegro sections, and gorgeous little freeze frame moments. A good dash of Scottish dancing, bagpipes and kilts make it a much more colourful affair! But I have to say, I’m not a huge fan of these endings, I’m a typical ‘happily ever after’ kind of girl. Maybe I’ll start re writing my own endings!

Alicia 💗

ballet · Dance

Ballet classics – Coppélia


I’ve always been fond of this ballet. I love the theatrics involved, the doll-like actions and the fact that ballet doesn’t have to be serious – it can have humour too! Coppélia is a light hearted ballet, and popular as an introduction to ballet for young children.

The story starts out with 2 young lovers, Swanilda and Franz, who are planning to marry during a village festival. Swanilda has recently noticed Franz paying a lot of attention to a girl named Coppélia, who sits on the balcony of a house owned by local crazy inventor Dr Coppélius. Franz is determined to catch her attention, and Swanilda is left heartbroken and runs away.

One day, Dr Coppélius goes out, and loses his keys. Swanilda finds them, and with her friends, goes to investigate his house, and find out more about Coppélia. At the same time, Franz has decided to climb up to the balcony to meet the girl he is captivated with.

Upon entering, Swanilda realised that all the people in the room are in fact life like dolls, including Coppélia! She and her friends begin to wind all the dolls up. Dr Coppeélius returns, and is angry the girls have trespassed and disturbed his work, throws them out! He then finds Franz on the balcony but instead of sending him away as well, he invites him in. Unbeknown to Franz, the Dr wants to bring Coppélia to life, but needs a human sacrifice! He intends to kill Franz and take his soul to put into Coppélia. He feeds Franz some bread that has sleeping powder on it and Franz falls asleep. 

However Swanilda has been hiding in the workshop the whole time! She dresses up in Coppélia’s clothes and begins dancing, pretending the doll has come to life! She quickly wakes Franz, then winds up all the other dolls again to help them escape. Dr Coppélius is sad to find a lifeless Coppélia still behind the curtain.

As Franz and Swanilda are about to make their vows, Dr Coppélius interrupts and angrily demands payment for the damages they caused. Swanilda is sad that she has caused an old man such grief so offers her dowry as an apology. Franz steps in and offers to pay the Dr instead. Just then, the village Mayor gives the Dr a big of money. The happy couple marry and everyone celebrates. 

This is a ballet that not only the audience but the dancers themselves can have a lot of fun with. They can really use their acting skills, their comedic timing, their over the top dance moves, particularly for the dancer as Coppélia. When I was younger, I attended a repertoire workshop, and we were all taught how to be transformed into dolls! It was so much fun!  Very different to ballet in ways, flexed feet, rigid body, bent square arms. I love how subtle changes in choreography can instantly give a dancer a different feel, or in this case, a wooden one!

If you haven’t seen this ballet, I urge you to watch it next time you have the opportunity. You be pleasantly surprised how ballet and comedy can come together so easily! 

Alicia 💗

ballet · Dance

Ballet classics – Giselle

Giselle is a story about the true power of love, and I can’t help but be wrapped up in it!

Originally performed in 1842, Giselle was written in the romantic era of ballet (think long flowing tulle skirts and picture perfect postcard poses) It’s about a peasant girl Giselle, who lives a simple and happy life with her mother. Giselle loves to dance, but her mother always worries about her and is overprotective, as she has a weak heart. 

During festivities for Harvest, a young nobleman, Duke Albrecht, visits the village and falls madly in love with Giselle, even though he is already betrothed to another, Bathilde. With help from his squire, he disguises himself as a peasant boy by the name of Loys, and woos Giselle, who falls in love with him.

Giselle has another admirer in the village, Hilarion, who goes to Giselle to warn her Loys cannot be trusted, and not to get involved with him, but she does not listen. At the festivities, there is lots of dancing, and Giselle and Loys dance together. Meanwhile Hilarion has discovered the truth about Loys, and outs his secret in front of everyone. Poor Giselle is devastated at being deceived by her lover, flies into a crazed episode “the mad scene” completely heartbroken, she starts to dance irratically, which proves too much for her fragile heart, and she passes away in Albrecht’s arms, who then flees the village in guilt.

Hilarion visits Giselle’s grave, but is scared away by The Wilis, a group of maiden spirits who were betrayed by their lovers. Their leader Myrtha, is particularly scornful, and together they seek out men and make them dance until they die of exhaustion as their revenge. Myrtha summons Giselle from her grave, just as Albrecht comes to pay his respects. He begs Giselle for forgiveness, and because her love for him is so strong, she accepts, then disappears, Albrecht following behind.

Meanwhile The Wilis have found Hilarion, made him dance until exhaustion, then drowned him in a lake. They then turn on Albrecht. He. He and Giselle beg Myrtha for him to be spared, but she does not listen, and makes him dance until dawn. However, the power of Giselle’s love is so strong, it breaks the Wilis spell, and Albrecht lives. At sunrise, the wilis return to their graves, but Giselle’s love has also broken their hold over her. She  returns to her grave and can rest in peace.

The choreography plays a big part in this ballet, particularly for The Wilis. The endless courus, that glide so effortlessly across the floor, as though they were hovering, the lightness and height in the jetes, combined with the floating tulle skirts, and continuous flow of the arms in ports de bras, actually transform them into ghosts right before your eyes!

Such a beautiful story, one that is still relevant today. It offers hope,that even though we can be hurt, lied to, betrayed and heartbroken, love really is the most powerful thing. It will mend, it will repair, it will teach us to trust again. And there’s no better story than that!
Alicia 💗

ballet · Dance

Ballet Classics – Swan Lake

This is a new series of blogs about the great ballet classic stories, that we may or may not be familiar with. You may have seen one of them, you may have seen them all, so this series will either reignite your passion for your favourite, or enlighten you  with a new story.

How could I begin without starting with Swan Lake. It is my, and I’m sure, many of yours, favourite ballet. It is a tale of enchantment, love, perseverance, deceit and betrayal. The main character, Odette has been put under a curse by the evil Rothbart. By day she is forced to live as a swan, with others who suffer the same fate, only transforming to her human form at night. The only way to break the spell is for a man to declare eternal love for her. Enter Primce Seigfreid. He discovers Odette on a hunting trip and completely captivated by her, falls in love. He slowly wins the love of Odette, and invites her to a ball at the palace. Rothbart is furious that his spell might be broken, so sends his daughter Odile, to the ball. She entices and tricks poor Siegfried into him thinking she is Odette, and he declares his love for her. At this, Odette’s heart is broken. Unable to cope with living as a swan forever, she takes her own life, as does Prince Siegfried, who is distraught at the realisation of what has happened. Don’t worry though, true love conquers all, all they are reunited in death for eternity.

I’m not entirely sure what makes Swan Lake such a hit. I think it’s a real combination of things coming together to create a masterpiece that even non ballet lovers have taken to their hearts. The music, written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky,  is wonderful at setting the tone for each event. The costumes for the swans encapsulate the elegance, the signature moves and positions which are immediately recognisable, and the wonderful choreography and perfect synchronicity of the corps de ballet, which have a huge role in telling the story, and wouldn’t be the same without them. 

My favourite part about Swan Lake, which has always inspired me, is that the roles of Odette and Odile, are played by the same ballerina. Each role is strenuous enough that they could be separate roles, so the prima ballerina must have enough strength and stamina to be able to perform both. It’s the most physically demanding of all the balllets. Not only must the ballerina have the technical ability, she must be the ultimate actress. She must be able to portray Odette/Odile in their own right. Facial expressions, subtle changes in posture, demeanour. If you’ve ever seen Swan Lake, it’s the ballerina is almost unrecognisable from when she starts as the white swan, the epitome of purity, delicate, shy, elusive, unassuming and gentile, to when she enters as the black swan, bold and brash, sly, seductive and confident. They are polar opposites, and for the same ballerina to use all her skills and allow her to transform, is a true spectacle and what contributes to the magic.

I cannot write this blog without talking about ‘the dying swan’ scene. The music is haunting. It was created for the great Anna pavlova. If you haven’t seen her perform it, I urge you to look it up. Yes, you can tell how much ballet technique has progressed, but the feeling she puts into it is like no other. She really becomes the dying swan. You can feel her pain and heartache. You can feel her beginning to get tired and let go, then the frantic last moments of resistance before she finally gives in and succumbs to death. She is mesmerising.

Ultimately, I think it’s the love at the heart of the story that captivates us. Two peaople coming together, so beautifully, only to be torn apart. We love when love prevails, even if that has to be in death. Love knows no bounds, and Odette and Seigreid remind us of that.

Be sure to keep an eye on my Instagram and Facebook pages, where I’ll be posting some videos and photos of the iconic steps and poses!
Alicia 💗

Dance

Receiving corrections – how to be a good student 

Why do you go to dance? Is it a hobby? Is it a passion? Do you want to improve? Whatever the reason, when you attend a class, you will enevitably receive corrections from the teacher. Here is how you can be a humble student.

I touched up slight on corrections in my last blog post Class etiquette https://amummyfirst.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/class-etiquette-a-guide-to-good-class-manners/  so I’m going to go into a bit more detail to help you.
Firstly, your teacher will assume you are there because you want to be there, and want to LEARN. If you truely want to learn your craft, and excel in it, you have to be humble. No one but no one is born a perfect dancer, you have to work for it. You have to realise your weaknesses and work 10 times harder on them. 


ATTITUDE

Always remember, your teacher WANTS you to improve. They would not give a correction if they did not think you were capable of improving on it. They have faith in you! They don’t pick things out to be mean or embarrass you, it’s quite the opposite. So when you receive a correction, don’t see it as a negative thing, see it as an opportunity to impress your teacher. Prove to them you want to be there! Equally, don’t be offended by a correction. Watch your body language and always be thankful for recieving a correction.


MEMORY

Embarrassment is one thing, flippancy is another. You must REMEMBER what your corrections are. A good way to do this is to have a little notebook with you, and at the end of the class, write down any corrections you were given, while they are fresh in your mind. Once your teacher has given you something to work on, they expect just that. So if you’ve written them down and looked over them a couple of times through the week, you will be able to apply yourself more to those areas when doing that particular exercise. One step better than that, is actually WORK on them at home or in between classes! By practicing your errors over and over, you will slowly improve on them, to the point that one day, you won’t even have to think about doing it, your body will just automatically do it! Practice makes perfect! 


LISTEN

Your teacher won’t be just giving corrections to you during class. They will be firing them out to anyone at any time that they spot something isn’t quite right. This does not mean that it doesn’t imply to you. Whenever you hear a correction, take it upon yourself to self critique. Ask yourself “am I doing that too?” If you are, you can go about fixing it. Even if you’re not, it will only make you aware of what technique is required for that particular aspect of the exercise. By doing this with every correction, you will be improving on your own technique tenfold. Never assume you don’t need a correction, check if you don’t!!!!

So please above all, don’t take it personally. Take it as a chance to shine. There is no better feeling than working hard on something, repetitively over and over, until finally you crack it! The sense of achievement is huge! You will be so proud of yourself, and so will your teacher. Go make them proud!
Alicia 💗

Dance

Class etiquette – a guide to good class manners

We all know good manners cost nothing, simple P’s and Q’s (that’s Please and thank you for anyone not familiar with that term) are the very basics expected of you. But do you know what’s expected of you when you step into the studio or class? I’m here to enlighten you!

 

APPEARANCE

Most schools and studios will have a set uniform. It’s important to stick to this uniform for a couple of reasons. Firstly, like school, everyone will look exactly the same. No one will stand out for the wrong reasons, and if you go out as a group to an event, you’ll be easily recognised as to which dance school you attend. Secondly, your teacher will be able to see your body clearly. I know this might not sound appealing, but your teacher will be able to visibly see muscles that are/need to be engaged, so it will help with corrections, this helping to improve your technique.

Uniform should be kept clean and neat, no ladders in tights or holes in ballet slippers. Keep on top of when items go beyond a quick wash and repair.

Hair should always be neatly and securely off the face in a tight bun. Not only is it distracting for you and your teacher if you’re constantly fiddling with your hair, stopping you from fully concentrating on your dance, it’s also a health and safely risk. A whip in the eye from a loose ponytail or plait when executing a pirouette can do some real damage!

Both these aspects of appearance show your teacher you are serious about dance and your class and you’re ready to work hard.

PUNCTUALITY 

This is a biggie. It does not mean arriving when class is about to start. My teacher always used to say to us

“if you arrive on time, you’re already late”

Think of how long it takes everyone to enter the room, say their hellos, put on shoes and warm up. At least 10 minutes. So arriving as class is about to start will delay the class by that amount of time. Which might not sound a lot, but it soon accumulates over a few classes. That’s less dance time. Try and arrive 10-15 minutes before class, puwt on required shoes and do a little warm up. This means when you enter the room, you’re ready to start class with a warm body, meaning you’re less likely to injure yourself, and more able to execute the steps to your full potential.

INTERRUPTIONS

Always try and keep any interruptions to a minimum, but things will crop up, toilet brakes, loose ribbons, etc. Wait until your teacher has stopped talking, politely raise your hand and ask to be excused. If you are in the middle of an exercise, wait until the music has finished. Similarly, when coming back into the room, wait until you can hear the music stop before re entering. This is so you don’t distract your fellow dancers from what they are working on.

The same applies if you are late for class. Get ready outside of the class, and wait until the music has stopped before entering. This may not always be possible if you’re in back to back classes, all the more reason to make the transition as quick as possible. Apologise for being late to your teacher and quietly and quickly take your place, ready to start work. Your teacher does not want to hear lengthy excuses, nor do they need to, it will only delay class further. If you feel the need to explain, wait until class has finished and speak to them at the end.

DEMEANOUR 

Be mindful of how you act in class between exercises. Body language says a lot! Try not to fold your arms, slouch and sit and lean into one hip. These are all passive aggressive postures, and although you may not mean them to be, they may be interpreted differently by someone. Also it may give your teacher the impression that you’re not interested in being there or working on corrections.

If the teacher is giving you a correction, listen intently and look like you are. Also, give other stundents the same curtesy, keep quiet whilst someone else is receiving corrections, so they don’t miss anything.

GOOD BYES

You probably already do a set cutesy or bow at the end of class, but it’s good manners to thank the teacher again and say good bye as you are leaving, to show you really mean it. Don’t forget your fellow students too! But try to keep chit chat to a minimum. There will probably be another class on straight after yours, and you don’t want to hold their class up! If you have something to say, wait until you’re outside of class, then you can take as long as you like!

Some schools will vary how strict they are with these kinds of things, and all schools and teachers will differ. But it’s good to be aware of how to act and what may be expected of you, particularly if you are considering a career with a professional company.

I hope this has been of help and Ill use good manners by thanking you for taking the time to read this!

Alicia 💗